Tag Archives: hunting

Massaman Goat Curry Pie

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Shooting goats was the way many of us first graduated from hunting small to larger game and this recipe in my opinion transforms the humble goat into something pretty special. This recipe uses all of the animal which I think is really important, if we’re taking a life we should give it the respect it deserves and try to not waste any of it. You can use any part of the goat for the pie, even the prime cuts if you like however if you do you won’t need to cook it as long. For this dish I have used the back leg meat (could use neck or shoulder too) for the pie and I’ve taken to the goat with a hacksaw to make racks but you could always just go the quicker route and take the back steaks off the bone, just make sure you cook them pink so they don’t dry out. Oh and if you’re taking a meat animal, as always the younger nannies will taste the best.

goat 

Massaman Goat Curry Pie
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Tomato Salsa
4 Tomatoes, large
1/4 Red onion
1/2C Pineapple
1/2C Cucumber
Mint, finely sliced/chopped
1tsp Lime juice (to taste)
1tsp Fish sauce (to taste)
Massaman Goat Curry Pie
650g Goat leg, trimmed and diced
1x 425ml Tin coconut cream
2 tablespoons Massaman curry paste
1 cup chicken stock
1/2 cup unsalted roasted peanuts
2 medium potatoes, peeled, medium dice
1 cinnamon stick
2 bay leaves
5 cardamom pods
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon tamarind
1 tablespoon fish sauce
Plus
1 packet puff pastry sheets
1 egg, whisked with 1Tbs milk
2Tbs butter, melted
Tomato Salsa Method
Take the seeds out of the tomatoes and the cucumbers but you can leave the cucumber skin on. Small dice the tomato, pineapple and cucumber but finely dice the onion (as fine as you can). Combine all the ingredients and season to taste with salt and pepper.
Massaman Goat Curry Pie Method
In small batches, sear the diced meat in a hot pan with a little oil until it is nicely browned and put to one side. In a pot large enough to fit all your ingredients, fry the spice paste until it becomes fragrant, add the meat and all the other ingredients (except the puff pastry, egg and butter). Simmer on a low heat on the stove or covered in a baking dish in the oven set to 160C for about 2hrs or until meat is nice and tender. You can add more tamarind and fish sauce or sugar to taste. Cool. Once the mix is cold you can use to fill your pies. I like to make individual pies, how many pies you get out of the mix will depend on how big or small you would like them but this amount should get you about 10 or so medium sized pies or one really big one. Grease your pie moulds with some melted butter, cut circles of puff pastry large enough to fill your mould right to the edges, push the pastry into the moulds and prick the base with a fork to stop it from puffing up at the bottom. Fill your pies with the cold goat curry mix, brush the edges of the pastry with your whisked egg, cut out circles of pastry for your lids and crimp the pie lid on with a fork. Trim the overhanging edges with a knife and brush the top with your egg mix. Bake at 180C until the pastry is cooked and golden brown, (about 12-15mins depending on the size of your pies and the oven). Leave to cool just enough to handle and remove from the moulds. You can make these pies ahead of time and reheat them in the oven on a low heat. Serve with some tomato and pineapple salsa. Here I have served the pies with some salsa, jus and grilled goat rack garnished with picked coriander.
MacLean Fraser http://macleanfraser.com/
 

 

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BBQ Wild Pork Ribs

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When summer is well under way this recipe is perfect to pull out for the BBQ. To get prepared ahead of time you can make the BBQ sauce and the dry rub beforehand and even go so far so pre-cooking the ribs. Once you’ve got everything ready you’re free to enjoy some beers and just throw the ribs on the BBQ and baste with the sauce once you’re ready to serve. Don’t worry if the sun isn’t shining though, you can still make this in the oven and if you don’t have time to go running round the hills then this recipe will work just fine with ribs from the supermarket.

BBQ Ribs

BBQ Wild Pork Ribs
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Dry Rub
2Tbs Smoked Paprika
2Tbs Cumin, ground
1Tbs Fennel, ground
2Tbs Onion Powder
1Tbs Salt
1tsp Pepper, ground
BBQ Sauce Marinade
1/4C Tomato Sauce
1/4C Sweet Chilli Sauce
2Tbs Golden Syrup
3Tbs Red Wine Vinegar
1Tbs Soy Sauce
1Tbs Worchester Sauce
1tsp Kaitaia Fire (or Tabasco)
1/4C Apple Juice
For the Dry Rub
Mix together the dry rub ingredients and rub all over your ribs. Wrap up in baking paper then tin foil and bake at 165C for 1hr 15mins until tender. Make sure there is a good seal on the foil so that the ribs retain all their moisture and don’t go dry.
For the BBQ Sauce
Combine all the ingredients in a pot and simmer over a low heat until reduced by about 1/3 and nice and syrupy.
To Serve
Once the ribs are cooked brush them with the sauce and either grill on the BBQ or roast in a hot oven. Turn and brush with the sauce until they are nicely glazed, sticky and browned.
MacLean Fraser http://macleanfraser.com/
 

 

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Lion huntress Melissa Bachman and wild food

hardcore huntressThis is not a hunting blog, although recently reading the furor that has gone viral on the internet after pictures of “hardcore huntress” Melissa Bachman with her trophy lion, being a chef I got thinking about the ethics involved in where our food comes from and people’s opinions regarding this. It is an interesting debate regarding wild food and the ethics surrounding it.  I read the comments of one of the articles and this picture has certainly enraged some people and has sparked some pretty intense debate. Lions are officially a “vulnerable species” with much of their range being reduced outside of national and game parks, most likely due to human encroachment. Bachman apparently shot this lion on a game park where people pay up to tens of thousands of dollars to shoot one of the “big five” African game species. There seems to be two distinct arguments from people, one is that she shouldn’t be shooting a lion and the other is that nobody should be shooting anything. As far as I am concerned, yes nobody should be shooting any animal which is at any sort of threat of being endangered and I think most people would agree upon this.   That nobody should be shooting anything… well this I am not sure about.  I think in our world of convenience a lot of people have a disassociation between food and where it actually comes from, ie meat comes from a living, breathing animal. I think that a boneless, skinless chicken breast in plastic wrap sitting on the pak n sav poulty section is so far removed from what was a few days before a walking breathing and feathered chicken that people have forgotten this fact. If you are a person who eats meat, why then would you be opposed to hunting? If an animal in the wild is shot in the correct place with an appropriate sized rifle and  therefore dies a fast and humane death then what makes this worse than factory farmed animals? red deerPersonally if you asked me what I would rather be re-incarnated into, would it be an animal that was born in captivity, fed an artificial diet possibly full of steroids to make me grow fast, lived my entire (short) life in a cage before being jammed into the back of a truck before being stunned, bled and then processed OR would it be an animal born into the wild and living free before one day being shot in the head, well that’s a no brainer (sorry no pun intended…). If an animal such as red deer which are plentiful (and actually considered a “pest” by the New Zealand Department of Conservation) are shot and humanely killed with none of the meat wasted then what’s the difference between that and the cow that ends up as sirloin steak in the supermarket? Perhaps because it’s a little bit more in your face and shows the reality of the food chain? Perhaps we have come to a point in time where meat from a cow is now more associated with a Quarter Pounder than the thing that eats grass and goes moo?hot dogs Now if you want to see something really disgusting you should google how a hot dog is made, although I doubt anyone would think twice about ordering one at the rugby but they might think twice about looking a cow in the eye and pulling the trigger. But that’s how it works, people have to kill living creatures in order for us to eat them, maybe even after they have been processed, mechanically reclaimed and emulsified with water, colour and preservatives before being made into hot dog or sausage patty shapes and then making their way into everyone’s Sausage McMuffin… Compare that with wild game which has grazed on a natural and superior diet which results in a better flavoured and higher quality meat. I think the only people who can argue against sustainable, humane and ethical hunting would be vegans. I respect anyone who has an opinion based on moral grounds and sticks to their guns, I can appreciate that. Anyone else, well it’s a bit hypocritical arguing against hunting when it’s just someone else who is doing your killing for you, isn’t it??? 

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